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Discovery Phase: Students carried out more than a hundred interviews: with their supervisors at their internship centres, with professional colleagues and with teachers. It proved possible to identify a number of common attributes and qualities of a good professional.

Adopt a Bias toward Action

Some students acknowledge how difficult it was to focus on positive traits, given the temptation to voice complaints. The general feeling after the session of sharing the interview impressions was of being proud of their chosen profession.

Fostering Entrepreneurship and Innovation in Higher Education

There was a positive atmosphere and enthusiasm for taking the next step. It is interesting to note that many groups mentioned political advocacy as a promising professional activity.

Design: All of the groups set priorities in their own education, mentioning the need to incorporate technological issues in their curriculum, and suggesting that the university should offer joint interdisciplinary subjects among its degrees. Innovation, technology and language competences were highly valued, along with programmes to favour professional mobility. Some specific actions to promote technological skills were mentioned, such as the development of drone technology projects by social educators.

With regard to political actions, students suggested specific actions at the community level and the strengthening of bonds with social movements. Delivery: Students presented their final essay directly on the Internet. The final message of each group offered an enthusiastic view of their future profession, with some concrete suggestions for arriving at this desired future. All of the presentations achieved an acceptable English level. Regarding the incorporation of technologies into the learning process , all of the students were familiar with the Moodle platform and to Facebook.

The innovative aspect was to deliver content trough the Facebook page — in order to get up to date with the subject students should follow and share material on the social net instead of downloading presentations from the Moodle platform as they were used to. The most challenging requirement was to deliver a final media piece on the Internet. The objective was to favour creativity and to share their results. There were no pre-set expectations regarding the use of the multimedia tools.

As those technologies are not usual in their career, expectations were not high. The results have shown that we could perfectly incorporate technological requirements on our assessment guidelines not only in this subject but in others of their curriculum. The technologies used to present the final project were Moviemaker and presentations with Powtoon, Videoscribe, Magisto and Prezi.

There were some very high level video productions, with outdoor locations and a drone camera. Students also had to deal with copyright issues in selecting the material to be used in their video, a constraint that is worth mentioning, but one that also brought an interesting discussion into the learning process. In relation to language skills , allowing intermediate tasks to be delivered in Spanish generated a predisposition to work. In the supervision sessions it was possible to observe that English was not an issue during class time, and students were grateful to join a multilingual class in which they were not obliged or forced to speak in English.

Students with some grasp of English were able to feel comfortable about making mistakes and about helping their colleagues in the tutoring sessions by translating. Students with a low level of English were surprised to realize they could learn content and participate despite their inability to speak the language. In addition, the exposure to attractive international material played a part in enhancing their awareness of the importance of improving their English competence beyond academic requirements.

Concerning methodology , the tool itself was also a learning experience, as students are now able to use AI for promoting social change in the institutions or communities they will be working with. Students were asked how they would assess their final competences on a scale from 1 to The main contribution made by this work is the successful combination of three innovative aspects in a replicable format that can be applied to other disciplines: a multilingual environment, a new and promising content and a positive methodology. The multilingual environment created an atmosphere of confidence by using an inclusive approach that allowed students to innovate and create content in English — something that was unthinkable on the first day of class.

As mentioned at the beginning of this article, the development of a subject in English in a non-native environment can be intimidating and stressful. In our experience, English constituted part of the communicative environment, but was not an obstacle. Within a few years it may well be possible to increase the amount of spoken English in class. In the meantime there is a generation of students on the way to enhancing their English communication skills. Moreover, they also used innovative tools on the Internet to encapsulate their message and their discourse, instead of reproducing the same presentation mode they have been used to.

At the same time, we also challenged our students to think about how to innovate in their professional field. For instance, learning from social projects that are using drones to teach children within the autism spectrum opened up new interests and revealed work possibilities. In light of this, the final products reflected a very positive image of the perspectives of innovations in the social sector as well as their willingness to innovate as future professionals.

How Are Schools Fostering Innovation For Kids Who “Think Differently”?

In addition, in their design phase the planning for reaching the expected future the students included some aspects directly related to new needs on their curriculum. This should also foster curricular innovation on our part, for instance, by responding to their interest in the application of information and communication technologies to social education or social services management.

Finally, the methodology of the AI project favoured a positive engagement with their future profession. Third-year students usually form their first clear impressions of the profession as they begin their internships. The current context of economic constraints, fewer resources and low budgets presents them with a reality that can be tough to deal with.

It can also be seen as a threat to their chances of future employment, thus engendering anxiety. By using scenarios and resources from the Appreciative Inquiry Methodology, we invited students to discover, dream and design a social destiny that is worth working for. All authors have made substantial contributions to conception and design, analysis and interpretation of data, have been involved in drafting the manuscript and revising it critically and have given final approval of the version to be published.

MTC conceived the study and the design, carried out the implementation and coordinated the draft process. GRB contributed to conception, participated in the design of the study, performed the assessment analysis and helped to draft the manuscript. GRG contributed to the conception, participated in the design and coordination and helped to draft the manuscript.

All authors read and approved the final manuscript. The article contains nothing that is unlawful, libelous, or which would, if published, constitute a breach of contract or of confidence or of commitment given to secrecy. Skip to main content Skip to sections. Advertisement Hide. Download PDF. Fostering innovation in social work and social education degrees: multilingual environment and tools for social change. Open Access. First Online: 03 October Introduction The present article sets out the experience of implementing a new subject called International Perspectives on Social Innovation offered to Social Work and Social Education students at a Spanish university.

The main competences to be achieved were: 1. The development of creative thinking and envisioning. Two main assignments were set: 1. For each assignment there was an assessment guideline, a standard document of our faculty that clarifies the assessment criteria, the grading system, the expected results and the deadlines.

Fostering Entrepreneurship and Innovation in Higher Education – YouthProAktiv

Table 1 Competences and learning results. Competences Learning activities Learning results Assessment activities 1. Within a few years it may well be possible to increase the amount of spoken English in class. In the meantime there is a generation of students on the way to enhancing their English communication skills. Moreover, they also used innovative tools on the Internet to encapsulate their message and their discourse, instead of reproducing the same presentation mode they have been used to.

At the same time, we also challenged our students to think about how to innovate in their professional field. For instance, learning from social projects that are using drones to teach children within the autism spectrum opened up new interests and revealed work possibilities. In light of this, the final products reflected a very positive image of the perspectives of innovations in the social sector as well as their willingness to innovate as future professionals. In addition, in their design phase the planning for reaching the expected future the students included some aspects directly related to new needs on their curriculum.

This should also foster curricular innovation on our part, for instance, by responding to their interest in the application of information and communication technologies to social education or social services management. Finally, the methodology of the AI project favoured a positive engagement with their future profession.

Third-year students usually form their first clear impressions of the profession as they begin their internships. The current context of economic constraints, fewer resources and low budgets presents them with a reality that can be tough to deal with. It can also be seen as a threat to their chances of future employment, thus engendering anxiety. By using scenarios and resources from the Appreciative Inquiry Methodology, we invited students to discover, dream and design a social destiny that is worth working for. All authors have made substantial contributions to conception and design, analysis and interpretation of data, have been involved in drafting the manuscript and revising it critically and have given final approval of the version to be published.

MTC conceived the study and the design, carried out the implementation and coordinated the draft process. GRB contributed to conception, participated in the design of the study, performed the assessment analysis and helped to draft the manuscript. GRG contributed to the conception, participated in the design and coordination and helped to draft the manuscript. All authors read and approved the final manuscript. The article contains nothing that is unlawful, libelous, or which would, if published, constitute a breach of contract or of confidence or of commitment given to secrecy.

Research article Open Access. Fostering innovation in social work and social education degrees: multilingual environment and tools for social change. Abstract The article presents an innovative educative experience in higher education in Spain that combines methodology, content and new technologies in a multilingual environment. Innovation Educational Technologies Higher education Social innovation Content and language integrated learning Appreciative inquiry.

The main competences to be achieved were: 1. The development of creative thinking and envisioning. Two main assignments were set: 1. For each assignment there was an assessment guideline, a standard document of our faculty that clarifies the assessment criteria, the grading system, the expected results and the deadlines. Table 1 Competences and learning results. Competences Learning activities Learning results Assessment activities 1. Practical and theoretical Classes Case Analysis To identify international initiatives of Social Innovation To describe the innovation process and the concepts of social innovation To identify the main skills required To identify key factors to be replicable.

To develop creative thinking and envisioning Workshop sessions Appreciative Inquiry Methodology To take into account factors such as leadership, envisioning, personal competences, management and networks. Students were invited to develop and present a project in which they would: Explore what is really working well in their field in a positive way discovery phase. Design how they would achieve this vision design phase. Students had to work in small groups of 4 to 5 people.

They were expected to deliver 3 intermediate tasks Discovery, Dream and Design and a final product - a video or a web presentation to be published on the Internet in English, expressing their Destiny phase. Supervision and tutoring were offered in each phase to assure the accomplishment of requirements before moving to the next step. Table 2 Intermediate tasks. To achieve the objective of this assignment, students had to ensure that at least one member of their group was fluent in written and oral English, search for and agree on a social context of interest to them, plan the way they would work, define a schedule and deliver all four tasks.

The methodological steps adopted for each of the phases are described below: A. Students were invited to make contact with a professional and interview him or her. Each student had to conduct at least one interview and the group had to deliver a summary of the main conclusions of the interview process, in English, Spanish or Catalan. After all of the groups had concluded the interview phase, they were invited to share their findings orally in class, in English, Spanish or Catalan.

This contributed to identifying the positive aspects of the profession that would inspire and motivate the next phase. Table 3 Interview questions. Why was it so good?


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What kind of feelings do you associate with this experience? Table 4 Dream phase guideline. What kind of technologies will be employed in these projects? Delivery Phase: Finally, for this phase, they were expected to deliver a final product in English on the Internet expressing the overall idea of their AI project.

This final product could be a video, a drawing, an animation, a comic, or a presentation. Regarding content assimilation , a summary of the main achievements in each phase is illustrative. Competing interests The authors declare that they have no competing interests. References Bean, J. Engaging ideas. San Franscisco: Wiley. Google Scholar Cavalcante, M.

Assessment Guidelines — Google Scholar Cooperrider, D. A positive revolution in change: appreciative inquiry. Public administration and public policy, 87 , — Google Scholar Halbach, A. The accreditation of English language level in Spanish universities. British Council.

Fostering Innovation with John Hagel - Singularity Hub - Exponential Manufacturing

CLIL in Spain. Implementation, results and teacher training. Take, for example, the 13,student Albermaie County school district in Virginia, which was featured in an article in EdWeek. Superintendent Pamela R. Moran actively reaches out to business owners in the community to discover what skills these business leaders believe are needed to create innovative minds. She then takes these ideas back to her district. Moran said. Some of the methods Moran has put into place include offering computer-programming workshops so students learn how to code, while providing teachers the support they need to turn their classrooms into true learning environments.

Mazur believes that students should have the ability to learn material on their own time, with classes saved for making sense of how it applies in the real world. Technology, it seems, is a driving force for any district noted for their progressive approach to innovative education.