Ford Mondeo Owners Manual (Europe)

There are two slide sets in Spanish with titles that indicate that the material .. Item 8 Title Be Safe with Pesticides, Use Pesticidas con Cuidado ' Address .. and evidence of cancer, reproductive damage or mutagenic effects in animal toxicfty publicidad a la existencia de los materiales educativos en salud y proteccion.

Free download. Book file PDF easily for everyone and every device. You can download and read online Welfare Grind Part 3 file PDF Book only if you are registered here. And also you can download or read online all Book PDF file that related with Welfare Grind Part 3 book. Happy reading Welfare Grind Part 3 Bookeveryone. Download file Free Book PDF Welfare Grind Part 3 at Complete PDF Library. This Book have some digital formats such us :paperbook, ebook, kindle, epub, fb2 and another formats. Here is The CompletePDF Book Library. It's free to register here to get Book file PDF Welfare Grind Part 3 Pocket Guide.

She's in my thoughts, for her recovery I pray. Uh, wow. I'm afraid I've got an issue to deal with, and err by the mail clerk. It's against our strict protocols, but could I store some at your "base"? Gosh I'm not sure about that. If the boss finds out I'm breaking protocol, he'll beat me with a bat. But if I get caught just one more time, they'll surely give me the sack. I have to say I'm surprsied, at your willingness to assist.

Perhaps I was wrong about you all along. Consider yourself on the shitlist. That went about as well as predicted. Look, I've played video games too. I know as well as you do that there's a decent chance this guy is going to turn out to be evil, but from HENRY'S perspective, this is the only reason he still has a job. And then he just casually strolls away! It's honestly more of a sachet, but whatever. Either that or it's the crap office, and it's kind of a running joke.

Let's leave it for now any fuse box in this wing you can interact with to get this prompt 12 This is our office. Let's put off checking it out for now Apparently her post is very suspicious and shady. All of a sudden the neighborhood's homeless population stopped disappearing? I'm assuming that she murders people and serves them as dishes, not that her food stopped the population from disappearing. Why animals?

Why is this the first time any conflict has come up between us and the mentor? Why didn't he try to convince us, like, at all? Her personality sure has lots of grit. He complained about the soup one day then shortly after just disappeared. I mean, I know a giant amoral company doesn't care about employee welfare, but surely an employee base terrorized by a murderous chef is, if nothing else, less productive?

I'm not entering this door, it'll just be doom and gloom. And pepper spray. Orange Bottle - This bottle stinks really bad and has a secondhand demeanor, with a handwritten label that says "highly corrosive cleaner". Or should I leave it here and avoild my colleageues' scowl. Surely, some goons will know what's right! Janitor What's that weird smell in here?

It's really burning my nose. Makes me feel kinda lightheaded, and tingly in my toes. My own special recipe cleaning solution. It's so corrosive it'll erode metal, even under heavy dilution! Why on earth would you need You'll probably eat us if we ask. How about that Harris huh? I'm sure it's like a magical night in Paris Aren't you funny? The man's disposition isn't exactly sunny. Whenever we have to interact, he always throws a fit. He seems like a violent type, should come with a warning label.

Doing well in college? The two must be getting clever, accumulating all that knowledge. They're as free-spirited as always, but they know when to buckle down. Gotta run! Hahahahahaha Ladder - A fine looking ladder, made out of wood. Looks like it's well constructed and good. Yeah way to go on that work. If I open it, I won't escape unharmed.

This is actually untrue - the alarm isn't hooked up. It's just they don't let you go outside because you don't need to yet. Just throwing it out there. We're taking the stairs in this wing, and it's only Basement - 3rd floor. Down first of course. The label says it used to house argon. You can tell by their red color - I had a colleague inhale some and he died. It says here they were manufactured in Mexico.

Any science building worth its salt will tell you to keep all your flammable gasses in the basement, and to just throw the old canisters in the hallway when you're done with them. There are no rooms down here, so where did they use all these? Henry said he can't remember the elevators ever working, so did they make somebody cart all these canisters down here? Instead of giving them to their gas supplier??? I know this is the tiniest of points, especially next to Not as exciting as a trash can with a bank receipt in it.

Or a nice ladder. If I thread [sic] this water, I'll get lethally shocked. Just walking the stairs, I have to take a breather. We've actually already encountered the solution to this 'puzzle', and if you think 'what is the dumbest, most "peak adventure game" solution to this I can imagine', you might get it if you have adventure game brain damage. I'm literally proud to say I had to look it up.

I'm welcoming guesses. Just concerned is all. Yeah it's both of them here. Why did you make somebody design these rooms?! I would have accepted without question that there were no bathrooms on the second floor! Well, at least now we know where people in the second floor of the old block of this stupid business go to do their business. Let's hear this critical story, that everybody probably spent a lot of time creating. If the boss saw this he'd probably get frustrated.

It's an archive of lies and deceit that really belongs in the bin. Add to Wishlist. USD 9. Sign in to Purchase Instantly. Explore Now.

Post navigation

Buy As Gift. Overview After surviving another attempt on her life, Keema Newell proves that a true hustler never dies. As a ghetto superstar and queen of the streets, she struggles to put the pieces of her life back together, while trying to tame her now notorious daughter, Treasure.

Money, murder and mayhem comes from every angle as Keema finds herself in a viscious web of deceit, tearing apart the lives of everyone she comes in contact with; ultimately, becoming fair game for her ruthless enemies. Conditions of use. Signboards shall be installed at a suitable height and in a position appropriate to the line of sight, taking account of any obstacles, either at the access point to an area in the case of a general hazard, or in the immediate vicinity of a specific hazard or object, and in a well-lit and easily accessible and visible location.

Without prejudice to the provisions of Part 2, Chapter 1, phosphorescent colours, reflective materials or artificial lighting shall be used where the level of natural light is poor. The signboard shall be removed when the situation to which it refers ceases to exist. Signboards to be used. Prohibitory signs—. The script underneath each of the following pictograms is included here to show the meaning of the sign but is not to be included in the signboard.

That script or any other relevant script may be shown on a supplementary signboard. Warning signs—. Mandatory signs. Emergency escape or first-aid signs. Fire-fighting signs. Containers used at work for dangerous substances or preparations to which the relevant statutory provisions apply and containers used for the storage of such dangerous substances or preparations together with the visible pipes containing or transporting dangerous substances and preparations shall be labelled pictogram or symbol against a coloured background in accordance with those provisions.

This paragraph does not apply to containers used at work for brief periods nor to containers whose contents change frequently, provided that alternative adequate measures are taken, for information training, or both, which guarantee the same level of protection. The labels referred to in this paragraph may be—. Signs shall be mounted as follows—.

Where appropriate, the signs referred to in paragraph 1 of this Part shall have the intrinsic features defined in paragraph 1. Without prejudice to paragraphs 1, 2 and 3, the labels used on pipes shall be positioned visibly in the vicinity of the most dangerous points, such as valves and joints, and at reasonable intervals. Areas, rooms or enclosures used for the storage of significant quantities of dangerous substances or preparations shall be indicated by a suitable warning sign taken from paragraph 3. Stores of a number of dangerous substances or preparations may be indicated by the warning sign for general danger.

The signs or labels referred to above must be positioned, as appropriate, near the storage area or on the door leading into the storage room. Fire-fighting equipment shall be identified by using a specific colour for the equipment and placing a location signboard, or by using a specific colour or both for the places where such equipment is kept, or their access points. For the purposes of paragraph 1 the specific colour shall be red. The red area shall be sufficiently large to allow the equipment to be identified easily.

The signboards provided for in paragraph 3. Signs for obstacles and dangerous locations. The dimensions of the markings shall be commensurate with the scale of the obstacle or dangerous location in question. Marking of traffic routes. Where the use and equipment of rooms so requires for the protection of persons, traffic routes for vehicles shall be clearly identified by continuous stripes in a clearly visible colour, preferably white or yellow, taking into account the colour of the ground.

The stripes shall be located so as to indicate the necessary safe distance between the vehicles and any object which may be nearby, and between pedestrians and vehicles. Permanent traffic routes in built-up areas outdoors shall, as far as is practicable, be similarly marked, unless they are provided with suitable barriers or pavements. The light emitted by a sign shall produce a luminous contrast which is appropriate to its environment, in accordance with the intended conditions of use of the sign, but without producing glare or an excessive amount of light or poor visibility as a result of insufficient light.

The luminous area emitting a sign may be of a single colour or contain a pictogram on a specified background. The single colour shall correspond to the table of colours and their meanings set out in paragraph 3 of Part A. When the sign contains a pictogram, it shall comply with all the relevant requirements of Part B. Specific rules governing use. If a device can emit both continuous and intermittent signs, the intermittent sign shall be used to indicate a higher level of danger or a more urgent need for the requested or required intervention or action than is indicated by the continuous sign.

The duration of each flash and the frequency of the flashes of an intermittent illuminated sign shall be such as to ensure the proper perception of the message, and avoid any confusion either between different illuminated signs or with a continuous illuminated sign. If a flashing sign is used instead of or together with an acoustic signal, identical codes shall be used. Devices for emitting flashing signs in the event of grave danger shall be under special surveillance or be fitted with an auxiliary lamp.

Acoustic signals shall:. If a device can emit an acoustic signal at variable and constant frequencies, the variable frequency shall be used to indicate a higher level of danger or a more urgent need for the requested or imposed intervention or action in relation to the stable frequency. The signal for evacuation shall be continuous.

Verbal communication between a speaker or emitter and one or more hearers shall take the form of sometimes coded short texts, phrases, groups of words or individual words. Spoken messages shall be short, simple and clear as possible and in a language understood by the persons involved; the verbal skills of the speaker and the hearing abilities of hearers shall be such as to ensure reliable verbal communication.

Verbal communication may be direct by means of the human voice or indirect by means of a human or artificial voice which is broadcast by whatever means is appropriate. The persons involved must have a good knowledge of the language used so thst they are able to pronounce and understand the spoken message correctly and consequently behave in a way which is appropriate to safety or health or both. If verbal communication is used instead of or together with gestures, code words should be used such as:. Specific rules governing use:. The signaller shall be able to monitor all manoeuvres visually without being endangered thereby.

The signaller's duties shall consist exclusively of directing manoeuvres and ensuring the safety of persons in the vicinity. If the conditions described in paragraph 2. The operator shall interrupt the ongoing manoeuvre in order to request new instructions if unable to carry out the orders received with the necessary safety guarantees. Coded signals to be used. The following set of coded signals are without prejudice to other codes applicable at European Community level, used for the same manoeuvres in certain sectors:.

Both arms are extended horizontally with the palms facing forward. The right arm points upwards with the palm facing forwards. Both hands are clasped at chest height. The right arm points upwards with the palm facing forward and slowly makes a circle. The right arm points downwards with the palm facing inwards and slowly makes a circle. The hands indicate the relevant distance. Both arms are bent with the palms facing upwards, and the forearms make slow movements towards the body. Both arms are bent with the palms facing downwards, and the forearms make slow movements away from the body.

The right arm is extended more or less horizontally with the palm facing downwards and slowly makes small movements to the right.

Account Options

The left arm is extended more or less horizontally with the palm facing downwards and slowly makes small movements to the left. Both arms point upwards with the palms facing forwards. Schedule Explosive Atmospheres. Places where explosive atmosphere may occur:. Flammable or combustible substances are considered as materials, which may form an explosive atmosphere unless an investigation of their properties has shown that in mixtures with air they are incapable of independently propagating an explosion.

Classification of hazardous places. Hazardous places are classified in terms of zones on the basis of the frequency and duration of the occurrence of an explosive atmosphere. The extent of the measures to be taken in accordance with Part 8 is determined by this classification. A place in which an explosive atmosphere consisting of a mixture with air of flammable substances in the form of gas, vapour or mist is present continuously or for long periods or frequently.

A place in which an explosive atmosphere consisting of a mixture with air of flammable substances in the form of gas, vapour or mist is likely to occur in normal operation occasionally. A place in which an explosive atmosphere consisting of a mixture with air of flammable substances in the form of gas, vapour or mist is not likely to occur in normal operation but, if it does occur, will persist for a short period only.

A place in which an explosive atmosphere in the form of a cloud of combustible dust in air is present continuously or for long periods or frequently. A place in which an explosive atmosphere in the form of a cloud of combustible dust in air is likely to occur in normal operation occasionally. A place in which an explosive atmosphere in the form of a cloud of combustible dust in air is not likely to occur in normal operation but, if it does occur, will persist for a short period only. Layers, deposits and heaps of combustible dust must be considered as any other source, which can form an explosive atmosphere.

Place where explosive atmospheres may occur. This note is not part of the Instrument and does not purport to be a legal interpretation. These Regulations, inter alia, revoke and replace -. The Regulations also revoke and replace an additional 20 full sets and 4 part provisions of—. In replacing the above statutory provisions, these Regulations are presented in a more self-contained easily accessible and user-friendly format, for example, through the restructuring of the layout of the Regulations and through reducing the overall number of Schedules by the incorporation of provisions formerly set out in Schedules in the main text of the current Regulations.

However, the overall thrust and the vast majority of the substantive requirements and prohibitions of the Regulations being replaced are maintained in these Regulations. The Regulations retranspose the following 14 EU Directives relating to occupational safety, health and welfare:. These Regulations also modernise legal requirements concerning the safe use of electricity in the workplace [Part 3 refers] and the provision of first-aid facilities at work [Chapter 2 of Part 7 refers].

Part 1 of the Regulations covers standard Interpretation and General provisions comprising citation and commencement, interpretation and revocations and savings. Part 2 of the Regulations relates to the Workplace and the use of Work Equipment at work. Chapter 1 of Part 2 of the Regulations sets out requirements relating to places of work as regards various matters including structural stability, ventilation, temperature, lighting, floors, walls ceilings and roofs, windows and sky lights, doors and gates, emergency routes and exits fire detection and fire fighting, movement of pedestrians and vehicles danger areas, loading bays and ramps, room dimensions and air space, general welfare requirements, sanitary and washing facilities.

Chapter 4 of Part 2 and Schedule 3 to the Regulations set out requirements relating to the Manual Handling of Loads as regards the duties of employers to take appropriate organisational measures or means to avoid the need for the manual handling of loads or, where the need for the manual handling of loads cannot be avoided, to take appropriate measures or use appropriate means to reduce the risk to employees involved in the manual handling of loads. Chapter 5 of Part 2 and Schedule 4 to the Regulations set out requirements relating to the provision and use of Display Screen Equipment DSE as regards the duties of employers concerning the analysis of the workstation, planning of work, minimum requirements for DSE, information and training and provision of eye tests and corrective appliances.

Part 3 of the Regulations relating to Electricity sets out a range of requirements including suitability of electrical equipment and installations, adverse or hazardous environments, identification and marking, protection against electric shock, portable equipment, connections and cables, overcurrent protection, auxiliary equipment and battery supply, switching and isolation for work on equipment made dead, precautions for work on electrical equipment, working space, access and lighting competent persons, testing and inspection, earth leakage protection for higher voltage, switch rooms, fencing of outdoor equipment and overhead lines and underground cables.

Part 4 and Schedule 5 to the Regulations relating to Work at Height set out a range of requirements as regards various matters including organisation, planning and risk assessment of work at height checking of places of work at height, weather conditions, avoidance of risks from work at height protection of places of work at height, selection of work equipment for work at height, condition of surfaces for supporting structures, stability of supporting structure, guard-rails, toe-boards, barriers etc.

Part 5 of the Regulations relates to exposure to Physical Agents at work. Chapter 1 of Part 5 of the Regulations sets out requirements relating to the Control of Noise at Work including exposure limit values and exposure action values, determination and assessment of risks above a lower exposure action value, provisions aimed at avoiding or reducing exposure application of upper exposure action values, prevention of exposure above noise level of 85dB A application of exposure limit value, personal protection, employee information, training and consultation, health surveillance, records and effects and exemptions.

Chapter 2 of Part 5 and Schedule 6 to the Regulations set out requirements relating to the Control of Vibration at Work including exposure limit values and action values, determination and assessment of risks, provisions aimed at avoiding or reducing exposure, application of exposure action values application of exposure limit value, employee information and training, health surveillance, records and effects and exemptions.

Part 6 of the Regulations relates to Sensitive Risk Groups. Chapter 1 of Part 6 and Schedule 7 to the Regulations set out requirements relating to the Protection of Children and Young Persons including risk assessment, circumstances prohibiting employment of a child or young person and health surveillance. The other requirements of this Directive have been implemented by the Protection of Young Persons Employment Act Chapter 2 of Part 6 and Schedule 8 to the Regulations set out requirements relating to the Protection of Pregnant, Post Natal and Breastfeeding Employees including risk assessment, protective or preventive measures, night work and information.

Chapter 3 of Part 6 of the Regulations sets out requirements relating to Night Work and Shift Work including general duties of employers with respect to night workers and shift workers, night work risk assessment and health assessment and transfer to day work. Inter alia, they require employers, who employ night workers, to carry out, for the purposes of the maximum hours of night working permitted under sections 16 2 a and 16 2 b of the Organisation of Working Time Act No.

They also require employers, whose night workers become ill or exhibit symptoms of ill-health as a result of performing night work, to reassign such workers to day work suited to them whenever possible. Chapter 1 of Part 7 and Schedule 9 to the Regulations set out requirements relating to the provision of Safety Signs at Places of Work including provision of safety signs, information and instruction for employees, prohibition of unauthorised information on signs, signboards, illuminated signs acoustic signs and hand signals.

These provisions apply to all places of work and they relate to signs referring to a specific object, activity or situation which provide information or instructions about safety and health at work. Chapter 2 of Part 7 of the Regulations sets out requirements relating to First-aid at places of work including provision of first-aid equipment, occupational first-aiders and first-aid rooms.

Part 8 and Schedule 10 to the Regulations relate to Explosive Atmospheres at Places of Work and set out various requirements including in relation to assessment of explosion risk, classification of places where explosive atmospheres may occur, prevention against explosion, safety of plant equipment and protective systems, training, instructions, permits to work, protection of employees from explosion and coordination at workplaces. Employers are required to classify places at the workplace where explosive atmospheres may occur into hazardous or non-hazardous places.

They must classify those places classified as hazardous into zones and apply the specified preventive measures. These measures include the selection of equipment and protective systems according to the categories set out in Part 8 and Schedule 10 to the Regulations. Protective systems may be integrated into equipment or separately placed on the market for use as autonomous systems. Subject to the particular periods referred to in Regulations 9, and , these Safety, Health and Welfare at Work General Application Regulations come into operation on 1 November Learn more about cookies and how to manage them.

Chapter 3 — Personal Protective Equipment 62 Provision of personal protective equipment. Chapter 2 — Control of Vibration at Work Interpretation.

Welfare Grind - Kendall Banks - Google книги

Chapter 2 — First-aid Interpretation for Chapter 2. Chapter 3 — Personal Protective Equipment Provision of personal protective equipment. Personal use. Part 3 Electricity Interpretation for Part 3. Part 4 Work at Height Interpretation for Part 4. Night work.

Related Books

Schedule 1 Regulations 43 , 46 , 52 , 53 , 55 Requirements for Work Equipment Part A — Exemption from certain provisions of Regulation 46 Class or description of hoist or hoistway Requirements of Regulation 46 which do not apply Condition 1. Paragraph 2 a and b. Paragraph 2 a , b and h ii. Paragraphs 2 a , b and c. Hoists and lifts, used as working platforms, not of a movable type, which do not pass through any floor and which are used in the butchering of animals Paragraphs 2 a , b and h iii.

Schedule 2 Regulation 62 Personal Protective Equipment Part A — Guide list of activities and sectors of activity which may require provision of personal protective equipment 1. Head Protection Skull Protection Protection helmets Building work, particularly work on, underneath or in the vicinity of scaffolding and elevated places of work, erection and stripping of formwork, assembly and installation work, work on scaffolding and demolition work.

Work in pits, trenches, shafts and tunnels. Earth and rock works. Work with bolt-driving tools. Blasting work. Shipbuilding work. Railway shunting work. Work in slaughterhouses. Foot Protection Safety shoes with puncture-proof soles Carcase work, foundation work and roadworks. Carcase demolition work. Scaffolding work. Work in contractors' yards and warehouses. Roof work. Safety shoes without pierce-proof soles Work on steel bridges, steel building construction, masts, towers, lifts, steel hydraulic structures, blast furnaces, steelworks and rolling mills, large containers, large pipelines, cranes, boiler plants and power stations.

Conversion and maintenance work. Working and processing of rock. Work with moulds in the ceramics industry. Lining of kilns in the ceramics industry. Transport and storage work. Safety shoes with heels or wedges and pierce-proof soles Roof work. Protective shoes with insulated soles Work with and on very hot or very cold materials. Safety shoes which can easily be removed Any work where there is a risk of penetration by molten substances. Safety shoes fitted with toecaps Any work where there is a risk of impact on or crushing of the foot caused by falling or projecting objects or collision of the foot with an obstacle.

Eye or Face Protection Protection goggles, face shields or screens Welding, grinding and separating work. Caulking and chiselling work. Rock working and processing work. Work on stock removing machines for small chippings. Drop forging. The removal and breaking up of fragments. Spraying of abrasive substances.

Work with liquid sprays. Work with and in the vicinity of molten substances. Work with radiant heat. Work with lasers. Work in the vicinity of the blast furnace charge. Spray painting where dedusting is inadequate. Hearing Protection Ear protectors Work with metal presses.

Work with pneumatic drills. Work with turbines. The work of ground staff at airports. Pile-driving work. Wood and textile working. Body, Arm and Hand Protection Protective clothing Work with acids and caustic solutions, disinfectants and corrosive cleaning substances. Work on flat glass products. Shot blasting. Work in deep-freeze rooms. Fire-resistant protective clothing Welding in restricted areas. Pierce-proof aprons Boning and cutting work. Leather aprons Welding. Gloves Welding. Metal mesh gloves Boning and cutting. Weatherproof Clothing Work in the open air in rain and cold weather.

Waterproof clothing. Work in wet processes. Reflective Clothing Work where the employees must be clearly visible. Safety Harness Work on scaffolding. Assembly of prefabricated parts. Work on masts. Safety Ropes Work in high crane cabs. Work in high section of drilling towers. Work in shafts and sewers. Skin Protection Processing of coating materials. Part B — Guide list of items of personal protective equipment 1. Head Protection Protective helmets for use in industry, including mines, building sites, other industrial uses. Hearing Protection Earplugs and similar devices.

Full acoustic helmets. Earmuffs which can be fitted to industrial helmets. Eye and Face Protection Spectacles. Face shields. Respiratory Protection Dust filters, gas filters and radioactive dust filters. Insulating appliances with an air supply. Diving equipment. Diving suits. Hand and Arm Protection Gloves to provide protection: from machinery piercing, cuts, vibrations, etc.

Finger stalls. Wrist protection for heavy work. Fingerless gloves. Protective gloves. Foot and Leg Protection Low shoes, ankle boots, calf-length boots, safety boots. Shoes which can be unlaced or unhooked rapidly. Heat-resistant shoes, boots and overboots. Thermal shoes, boots and overboots. Vibration-resistant shoes, boots and overboots. Anti-static shoes, boots and overboots. Insulating shoes, boots and overboots. Protective boots for chain saw operators. Removable instep protectors. Trunk and Abdomen Protection Protective waistcoats, jackets and aprons to provide protection from machinery, piercing, cutting, molten metal splashes, etc.

Headed waistcoats. Life jackets. Protective X-ray aprons. Body belts. Whole Body Protection Equipment designed to prevent falls Fall-prevention equipment full equipment with all necessary accessories. Clothing to provide protection from chemicals.

Tales From The Grind (Jorge Masvidal) - Episode 4 "Viva Las Vegas"

Heat resistant clothing. Thermal clothing. Dust-proof clothing. Gas-proof clothing. Protective coverings. Characteristics of the load The manual handling of a load may present a risk particularly of back injury if it is: too heavy or too large, unwieldy or difficult to grasp, unstable or has contents likely to shift, positioned in a manner requiring it to be held or manipulated at a distance from the trunk, or with a bending or twisting of the trunk, or likely, because of its contours or consistency or both , to result in injury to employees, particularly in the event of a collision.

Physical effort required A physical effort may present a risk particularly of back injury if it is: too strenuous, only achieved by a twisting movement of the trunk, likely to result in a sudden movement of the load, or made with the body in an unstable posture. Characteristics of the working environment The characteristics of the working environment may increase a risk particularly of back injury if: there is not enough room, in particular vertically, to carry out the activity, the floor is uneven, thus presenting tripping hazards, or is slippery in relation to the employee's footwear, the place of work or the working environment prevents the handling of loads at a safe height or with good posture by the employee, there are variations in the level of the floor or the working surface, requiring the load to be manipulated on different levels, the floor or foot rest is unstable, or the temperature, humidity or ventilation is unsuitable.

Requirements of the activity The activity may present a risk particularly of back injury if it entails one or more of the following requirements: over-frequent or over prolonged physical effort involving in particular the spine, an insufficient bodily rest or recovery period, excessive lifting, lowering or carrying distances, or a rate of work imposed by a process which cannot be altered by the employee. Individual Risk Factors The employee may be at risk if he or she: is physically unsuited to carry out the task in question, is wearing unsuitable clothing, footwear or other personal effects, or does not have adequate or appropriate knowledge or training.

Interference Regulation applies, in particular, where the mechanical vibration interferes with the proper handling of controls or reading of indicators. Indirect risks Regulation applies, in particular, when the mechanical vibration interferes with the stability of structures or the security of joints. Individual protectors Personal protective equipment against hand-arm vibration may contribute to the programme of measures referred to in Regulation Part B — Whole-body vibration 1.

Measurement When measurement is carried out under Regulation , the methods used may include sampling which must be representative of the personal exposure of an employee to the mechanical vibration in question with the methods and apparatus used adapted to the particular characteristics of the mechanical vibration to be measured, to ambient factors and to the characteristics of the measuring apparatus in accordance with ISO Standard Part B — Processes and work 1.

Part B — Pregnant employees 1. Working Conditions Underground mining work. Part C — Employees who are breastfeeding 1. Agents Chemical Agents Lead and lead derivatives insofar as these agents are capable of being absorbed by the human organism. Types of signs 1. Permanent signs 1. Occasional signs 1. Interchanging and combining signs 2. Any one of the following may be used if equally effective— - a safety colour or a signboard to mark places where there is an obstacle or a drop, - illuminated signs, acoustic signals or verbal communication, - hand signals or verbal communication.

Some types of signs may be used together— - illuminated signs and acoustic signals, - illuminated signs and verbal communication, - hand signals and verbal communication. The effectiveness of a sign shall not be adversely affected by: 4. Part B — Signboards 1. Intrinsic features 1. Conditions of use 2. Signboards to be used 3. Signs to be used 3. Signs to be used Part C — Signs on containers and pipes 1. Part D — Identification and location of fire-fighting equipment used exclusively for fire-fighting purposes 1. Part E — Signs used for obstacles and dangerous locations and for marking traffic routes 1.

Signs for obstacles and dangerous locations 1. Example: 2. Marking of traffic routes 2. Part F — Illuminated signs 1.

Welfare Grind Part 3

Specific rules governing use 2. Part G — Acoustic signs 1. Code The signal for evacuation shall be continuous. Part H — Verbal communication 1. Features: 1. Specific rules governing use: 2. Accessories: 2. Coded signals to be used Preliminary remark The following set of coded signals are without prejudice to other codes applicable at European Community level, used for the same manoeuvres in certain sectors: Meaning Description Illustration A.

Classification of hazardous places Hazardous places are classified in terms of zones on the basis of the frequency and duration of the occurrence of an explosive atmosphere. Zone 0: A place in which an explosive atmosphere consisting of a mixture with air of flammable substances in the form of gas, vapour or mist is present continuously or for long periods or frequently.

Zone 1: A place in which an explosive atmosphere consisting of a mixture with air of flammable substances in the form of gas, vapour or mist is likely to occur in normal operation occasionally. Zone 2: A place in which an explosive atmosphere consisting of a mixture with air of flammable substances in the form of gas, vapour or mist is not likely to occur in normal operation but, if it does occur, will persist for a short period only.

Zone A place in which an explosive atmosphere in the form of a cloud of combustible dust in air is present continuously or for long periods or frequently. Zone A place in which an explosive atmosphere in the form of a cloud of combustible dust in air is likely to occur in normal operation occasionally.

Zone A place in which an explosive atmosphere in the form of a cloud of combustible dust in air is not likely to occur in normal operation but, if it does occur, will persist for a short period only. Notes: 1. L , Part 1 Interpretation and General. Part 2 Workplace and Work Equipment. II correctly used, and. Part 3 Electricity.

Part 4 Work at Height. Part 5 Physical Agents. Part 6 Sensitive Risk Groups. Part 7 Safety Signs and First-Aid. Regulations 43 , 46 , 52 , 53 , Column 1. Column 2. Hoist or Lift.